Careers Programme

Careers Programme


At Godalming College we recognise the importance of goals and progression for our students.  Our Careers Programme is designed to maximise the opportunities for students to explore options whether they are initially clear on their career goal or not!  Guidance is one of our core Strategic Aims:  To provide high quality support and guidance, focusing on individual needs, interests and abilities, enabling students to confidently progress onto their next step beyond College.

Our team of highly experienced Careers professionals support and guide the teaching teams in high quality provision of careers information using tools such as Unifrog to help students explore all progression options and make the best choices. Specifically, we aim to help students understand themselves, to develop the knowledge and skills to investigate opportunities in learning and in work and to manage transitions in learning, progressing into appropriate pathways of further and higher learning and work. We support applications for a whole variety of applications for further education, higher education, specialist courses, apprenticeships (including degree apprenticeships) and employment.
We offer support to students who wish to apply for competitive specialist courses and degree courses which have additional requirements to the standard application process; this includes applications for Oxford and Cambridge, Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary Science, Music, Art and Drama.  Extra requirements can take the form of entrance exams, aptitude tests, portfolios, interviews and selection days.  This support takes the form of additional timetabled sessions, of one to one support and guidance in subject areas and one to one support for applications through the personal tutorial Shaping Futures programme.

All students have the opportunity for impartial advice and guidance from qualified Careers Guidance Professionals as well as ongoing support from subject teachers, personal tutors and senior tutors.  All students also have the opportunity to access support for work experience.

In addition to the programmes below, students have access to a variety of presentations and meaningful encounters with employers, universities and gap year organisations both in College and by attending external careers events.

Our Careers Lead is Carol Horlock, Assistant Principal, who is responsible for strategic direction supported by Christine Hudson, Head of Careers as the lead for CEIAG (Careers Education, Information, Advice and Guidance). They can be contacted at careers@godalming.ac.uk  

Pre-enrolment

Year 10 and 11 Open Evenings, Federation Careers Day, School Liaison events, Course Advice Sessions, Going to Godalming (Taster) Days

 

 

Access one year course

Year 1

Year 2

External events

Term 1

Enrolment interview Individual tutorials Study and work skills: Time management, Online reputation, building resilience, selling yourself

Enrolment interview Individual tutorials

Getting started

Getting involved

Reflecting on transition

Reflecting on performance

Independent learning techniques

Individual tutorials to discuss applications / destinations

Third Student Review Applications, CVs, personal statements

Employability skills

 

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion

University applicant days

 

 

Term 2

Individual tutorials Study and work skills: Interview success

Careers Options: Careers planning, job search, Unifrog, CVs, course research, re-application to 6th form, careers interviews, HE possibilities, Apprenticeship show

Individual tutorials

First Student Review

Introduction to Careers

UCAS Convention

Job & Apprenticeship Fair

National Careers Week

Next Steps Evening for parents

Individual tutorials Interview practice, Student Finance

Gap years Fourth Student Review

Social media job hunting

Personal Finance

Independent Skills for Living

Jobs & Apprenticeship Fair

 

 

UCAS Convention

 

 

National Apprenticeship show

Term 3

Individual tutorials

Individual tutorials to discuss applications / destinations

Second Student Review

Learner Voice

Personal Statements and CVs

Future Fridays programme of Careers talks and workshops

Individual tutorials Learner Voice

Results and Beyond

University Open days

 

 

 

Post results:

Post results service: results and careers support, destinations follow-up


aucshwitz - banner

Lessons from Auschwitz

This autumn the Godalming History department offered 4 students the incredible opportunity to participate in the ‘Lessons from Auschwitz’ Project. This project is run by the Holocaust Educational Trust and involves a one-day visit to the former Nazi concentration and death camp Auschwitz-Birkenau which is situated in Poland.
  
To take part in this exciting project we had to submit a detailed letter of application explaining why we thought we should be chosen. Schools and colleges across the country were invited to select their two most interested students to come together for this event.  Luckily for us, we were given more places - the four students selected from Godalming were Naomi Waters, Ella Norris, Laura Martin and Grace Musgrave. 

The first event was an ‘orientation seminar’, where we discussed in groups pre-war Jewish life and heard a first-hand testimony from a Holocaust survivor, Rudi Oppenheimer. This was a very powerful experience; Rudi told us all about his life before the war and the friends that he made before being Jewish made his family ostracised from the society that they had been such a part of. A young family of 3 small children, they managed to avoid deportation until June 1943, when they were rounded up and finally sent to Bergen-Belsen in Germany. He described the appalling conditions and the struggle for survival as increasing numbers of Jewish prisoners were brought to the camp from Auschwitz-Birkenau and elsewhere. Overcrowding, starvation and disease were rife. In January 1945, Rudi's mother fell severely ill and died. Rudi was only 13 years old. No one gave him the chance to say goodbye to her. She was simply taken away. His father died just two months later. Liberation came only a month after this.  Even in the liberation period he experienced further trauma - becoming separated from his little sister and being returned with his older brother temporarily to a concentration camp, also holding captured SS officers and prominent Nazis. Miraculously, the three children did survive, were reunited and moved to restart life in Britain.

This very personal account was both fascinating and devastating and brought home to us all present the shocking and unbelievable assault on the lives of so many ordinary people, whose communities were shattered. Understanding this is very important to the work of the Holocaust Educational Trust; they want to spread the message so that all people across the world understand what happened in the holocaust and the reasons why, so that nothing so destructive will ever happen again.

We thought about his story on our trip to Auschwitz on a freezing cold day a week later. Even with Rudi’s account it is impossible to envisage what took place. To try and place yourself into the situation is too horrific to bear. We saw mountains of hair, which had been shaved off the heads of every prisoner on arrival and thousands of shoes piled high, all that remained of families and children. A horrific scene and one which we could not express in words but could certainly not forget. 

The total loss of identity that the victims of the Nazi regime experienced is so shocking that the people and events risk becoming an overwhelming statistic. Despite this, there are still survivors, and we believe that is important to carry forward their stories to the next generation, so that the truth of what took place can be better understood, and never accepted again. Our next step is to take this message to a modern day audience. We are intending to go on Eagle Radio in the spring to talk about our experiences and the importance of tolerance in our multi- cultural society. Becoming ambassadors of the Holocaust Trust has given us the unique and valuable opportunity to keep this discussion alive.

By Naomi Waters

© Photo by Yakir Zur